Toys R’ Us Closes 180 Stores

Toys R’ Us Closes 180 Stores
Source: thesource

It seems we have come to the end of an era, as toy giant, Toys R’ Us is closing 180 stores in the US in order to avoid bankruptcy. While their Canadian cousins will not be affected, stores are going to need a complete revamp if they want to remain competitive in a modern digital market. With the rise of online shopping, digital gaming and casino online games, the toy chain has had a hard time keeping up with the curve, and can no longer cater to kids, or kids in adults bodies!

Are we seeing a departure from classic toys in favour of digital media? Possibly, but how do modern apps and games compare to some of the most famous toys from the 80’s and 90’s? We thought we would make a list and let you decide for yourself.

The Rubik’s Cube

Considered to be the best-selling game of all time, this hunk of coloured plastic has frustrated children and adults for generations. Since going on sale in 1980, over 350 million items have been shipped around into the eager hands of puzzle-loving fans.

Cabbage Patch Kids

If you were a child in the early 80’s, chances are you had a Cabbage Patch doll or wanted one rather desperately. Made entirely of cloth, these lovable but ugly as sin dolls became a huge fad and actually created one of the longest running franchises in US history.

Game Boy

The most popular portable gaming machine from the 1980’s can still be seen in popular culture some 39 years later. While it carried a heavy price tag, every budding gaming enthusiast had a Game Boy at some point in his or her life.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Figurines

Every child of the 90’s will have fond memories of the Turtles. Such was their legacy that they spawned two follow-on animated series and a couple of live action films. When the figurines were released, they were snapped up like hotcakes and went on to sell 30 million units by 2010.

Modern Games and Apps

Modern Games and Apps
Source: swantry

In 2018, children have all but forgotten about plastic figurines in favour of digital world. One app that adequately displays this transition is Toca Nature. With this app, children can create entire natural worlds by building hills, lakes and rivers, digging channels and planting trees. Creatures soon begin to appear such as fish, beavers and bears where children can observe them from above.

My Very Hungry Caterpillar

This is another case of digital replacing physical. In this app, children get up close and personal with a virtual caterpillar pet. Starting out as an egg, the caterpillar hatches to reveal a cute and cuddly wriggler that chomps away on any food you give it. The caterpillar also enjoys a bit of playtime and grows until eventually becoming a butterfly where the cycle starts all over again.

Kodable

Coding for kids might seem farfetched but this app has been designed for children between the ages of 4 and 11. The good news is that the app does not require the adults or children to have any coding experience. Using interactive stories, the app creates 40 scripted lessons with over 200 activities. The aim of the app is to encourage children to think like programmer and have them writing JavaScript before they can ride a bicycle! No wonder Toys R’ Us can’t compete.